In case of apocalypse and nuclear war: GitHub hid 21 TB of data in the Arctic for 1000 years

The team of the largest hosting service for IT projects GitHub, which Microsoft bought a couple of years ago, reported

on the successful implementation of the GitHub Archive project, which provides for the creation of an Arctic data archive.

What does it mean

Last year, GitHub representatives statedplans to store all data in the Arctic storage. The trip to the Arctic was scheduled for February but had to be postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak. And on July 8, the open source collection was successfully buried.

Basically, the vault is an ordinary metalcabinet, but it is located at a depth of 250 meters in a former coal mine on the Spitsbergen archipelago in the permafrost zone of the Arctic Circle. The repository was first used last October, with the CEO of GitHub personally delivering a reel of Linux, Android source code and 6,000 important open-source applications, as well as Vatican archives, Brazilian real estate records, Italian movies, and even a secret sauce recipe for an unnamed burger.


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Now 21 TB of data is recorded on 186 filmpiqlFilm coils. It is a digital photosensitive film that can be read by a computer or a person with a magnifying glass. It can survive for 1000 years and withstand a nuclear war or apocalypse.


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A special guide is attached to the archive,which will identify the location of each project and explain how to recover the data. There are also reels of technical history and cultural value of the content, as well as explanations of the foundations of modern computer science, computing, and open source development. As a result, future generations will be able to learn what our world was like and will be able to recreate computers and technology.

Currently, projects whose code has fallen into the archive are marked on the GitHub site with the mark "Arctic Code Vault Contributor".

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