AOC CQ32G1 review: 32-inch curved gaming monitor with 144 Hz


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Game monitors are no longer some kind of exotic and each manufacturer has its own gaming line.

Today we will get acquainted with a very interesting32-inch curved gaming model AOC CQ32G1. What is curious, the company has both game models in the main assortment, and a separate line of AGON with top solutions. For those not in the know, AOC was founded in 1967 in Taiwan, and is now part of TPV Technology, which is a very large manufacturer of monitors. In particular, it includes TP Vison and MMD, which produce televisions and monitors under the Philips brand, respectively.

What is it?

AOC CQ32G1 is a gaming 31.5-inch monitor with a curved VA-matrix, WQHD resolution (2560 × 1440), viewing angles of 178 °, maximum brightness of 300 cd / m2, 3000: 1 contrast ratio and semi-gloss coating.

What makes him interesting?

AOC CQ32G1 equipped with curved (radius of curvature1800R) 8-bit VA-matrix with a diagonal of 31.5 inches, resolution WQHD (2560 × 1440) and WLED-backlight. The matrix update frequency is 144 GHz, Freesync frame frequency synchronization technology is supported, and the pixel response time is 1 ms MPRT (Motion Picture Response Time). They promise a maximum brightness of 300 cd / m² and a color gamut of 125% of the sRGB color space. Among other useful things - the lack of flicker (FlickerFree).

What is included?


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As befits a large gaming monitor, AOCCQ32G1 is packed in a large colorful package with a monitor image and information about the main advantages. In the box, in addition to a monitor with a stand (disassembled), there are cables for connecting an HDMI and DisplayPort source, a power cable, documentation and a driver disk. In case there is such an exotic as an optical drive:


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What does he look like?


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AOC CQ32G1 looks in the best traditionsmodern gaming monitors: black and red colors, angular aggressive shapes and very thin frames, thanks to which you can make a very effective configuration of a pair of such monitors. At the bottom of the front panel is a wider plastic insert with the AOC logo and a red stripe in full width.


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Metal stand with black overlaymatte plastic, made in the form of a kind of arrow with a red circle around the base of the rack. Pretty massive, which positively affects the stability of the structure:


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The whole back panel is plastic, dark sulfurmatte color with trapezoidal planes, between which - 4 red inserts. In the upper part there is a large AOC logo, and lower in the middle is the platform to which the leg is attached. It is possible to use the VESA 100x100 mount instead of the foot and hang the monitor on the wall:


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The leg has a similar black and red color scheme, in the middle there is a hole through which you can pass all the necessary cables:


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The monitor cannot be called very thin, but it is quite logical. The power supply is located inside:


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To control the monitor, there are five buttons below the right side of the monitor:


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All connectors on the AOC CQ32G1 are directed down (except for the hole for Kensington Lock) and are located under the central platform. The set does not differ in something outstanding, but everything you need is:


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Game positioning of the monitor is immediately visible, inat the same time, the company did not “go too far” and did not shove all sorts of highlights that not everyone needs, and the price is clearly increasing. The monitor looks stylish. The only point is not the most accurate assembly, it feels like we have a fairly affordable model. But nothing critical.

What with usability, adjustment and connectors?

AOC CQ32G1 decided not to use the popularcontrol option with a joystick, all control is carried out by five buttons, which are located on the bottom of the monitor on the right. On the front there are button labels to make it easier to use, and a little to the right is the power indicator. In general, the buttons do not cause any inconvenience, especially since the notation is quite visual and it will be difficult to make a mistake.


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As already mentioned above, the panel with connectorsmonitor pointing down. There are enough connectors for connecting the source: there are HDMI 2.0, HDMI 1.4 and DisplayPort 1.2. There is also a 3.5 mm headset jack:


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For a neater installation in the leg there is a hole for cables. Nothing supernatural, but quite convenient:


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But the stand was not the most functional. In fact, it only allows you to change the angle of inclination in the range from 4 to 21.5 °. And if you can safely do without turning relative to the stand or turning into portrait mode, then the height adjustment is clearly not enough:


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The on-screen menu of the monitor turned out to be veryfunctional. First, about the quick functions: the first button on the left brings up a list of sources, the second switches the game mode presets, and the third one turns on the on-screen scope, which may be useful to someone in shooters.


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The fourth button brings up the main menu. The first tab is for adjusting brightness, contrast, eco-modes, gamma and DCR (dynamic contrast).


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The next tab is the color setting. There are presets: Warm, Normal, Cold, sRGB and Custom, in the latter case, you can adjust manually. There are also DCB color enhancement modes with Full Enhance, Nature Skin, Green Field, Sky-blue, and Auto Detect options.


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Next is Picture Boost, a function that allows you to select a separate area of ​​the screen and apply individual settings to it. I did not come up with a practical application, but it might come in handy for someone.


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The next section is responsible for setting up the on-screen menu and a couple of other things: position, language, timeout, a reminder of the rest and the volume in the headphones.


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For gamers, one of the most important will, of coursethe same section with the adjustment of gaming features. There are basic presets with advanced settings and fully customizable user presets. When using the presets Racing, FPS and RTS, you can enable LowBlue mode to reduce eye strain, enable FreeSync and a hardware frame counter. For three custom presets, you can fully configure everything. Including Shadow Control (brightening the darkest parts of the picture), adjusting the shade of Game Color and Overdrive matrix. The Low Input Lag option is useful when connecting a game console. Otherwise, the FreeSync function will be more useful, especially considering that NVIDIA has added its support to GeForce video cards starting with the Pascal architecture (GeForce 1000 series and newer).


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In the advanced settings section, everything else is located. Input selection, auto tuning, auto power off, DDC / CI switching and reset:


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On a PC, you can install proprietary software thatallows you to do about the same, but without game settings. It is common to all AOC monitors, apparently this is the reason. The application looks somewhat “archaic”, but it performs its functions.


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Like the AOC CQ32G1 with picture quality?

The monitor uses a curved VA matrix withwith a diagonal of 31.5 inches, a radius of curvature of 1800R and a resolution of 2560 × 1440. It has a frequency of 144 Hz, an average response time of 4 ms and a minimum of 1 ms MPRT (Motion Picture Response Time), which is more representative than GtG (gray to gray). The declared maximum brightness of 300 cd / m2, it is claimed that the color gamut is 125% of the sRGB color space. Visually, the picture is very good: rich color reproduction, contrast is very good, there are no obvious highlights or uneven backlights. From the nuances - at angles, the contrast decreases slightly and a yellowish tint appears. This is more noticeable on the vertical deflection, horizontally - much less. This is a common feature of VA matrices, although in the case of AOC CQ32G1 it is not too pronounced.


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In sRGB mode, the maximum brightness was 250.108 cd / m², the black field brightness is 0.255 cd / m², and the static contrast ratio is 981: 1, while the calibration is very good, the screen goes a little cold, and the color error ΔE does not exceed 8, which is very good for the game model . At the same time, in the settings you can correct and make the color rendering more accurate:


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In user mode, maximum brightnessamounted to 325.121 cd / m² (which is even higher than stated), the black field brightness was 0.317 cd / m² and the static contrast was 1026: 1, while the calibration did not suffer too much, and the color gamut, as promised, was slightly wider than sRGB:


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In the FPS preset, the maximum brightness is 286.568 cd / m² (which is even higher than stated), the black field brightness is 0.522 cd / m², and the static contrast is 546: 1. The picture becomes less natural, which is due to all sorts of additional exclusively game settings (highlighting dark areas of the picture and so on):


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How did he prove himself in games?


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At the moment, small diagonals and resolutionFullHD is gradually becoming a thing of the past for a number of trivial reasons: user requirements are growing, and the production price, for example, of these 32-inch 2560 × 1440 matrices is almost equal to FullHD. On the other hand, there is 4K, but at the moment, for a comfortable game in 4K, you need a very powerful hardware, which so far not everyone has. So 2560 × 1440 for the gaming monitor seems optimal to me. In AOC games, the CQ32G1 proved to be excellent: the picture is very smooth, without any gaps, artifacts or greases in any even the most dynamic games like shooters / battaloes like Destiny 2, CS: GO, Quake Champions or Apex Legends. 144 Hz is more than enough for a comfortable game. A very sensible color rendering makes the process even more enjoyable. For working purposes, the monitor is also quite suitable thanks to the large diagonal and a very high-quality matrix. Although for a more serious processing of photos and video factory calibration is not enough, you will still need to adjust manually.

In the dry residue

AOC CQ32G1 - a very interesting gaming monitor, onwhich is worth paying attention to those for whom the fast matrix with a high-quality picture is important in the first place, and not any additional “garlands” of backlighting that are currently lacking in game models. The monitor is equipped with a high-quality VA-matrix with good color reproduction, a decent margin of brightness and, of course, a very high refresh rate and pixel response. It has a decent amount of settings and additional features directly for games, plus support for FreeSync will definitely not be superfluous. Of the claims, one can only distinguish a very simple stand, which allows you to adjust only the tilt of the monitor and not the most accurate assembly. Official sales have not yet begun and there is no exact value yet. But, apparently, it will be 9,000 - 10,000 UAH, which is very good with these characteristics.

4 reasons to buy AOC CQ32G1:

  • high-quality VA-matrix with good brightness and color reproduction;
  • 144 Hz refresh rate and 1 ms pixel response time;
  • an abundance of game functions and settings;
  • neat and stylish appearance.

1 reason not to buy the AOC CQ32G1:

  • a very limited setup stand and not the most accurate assembly.

Technical characteristics of the gaming monitor AOC CQ32G1

Diagonal
31.5 ″

Matrix type
VA

Aspect ratio
16: 9

Resolution
2560 × 1440

Contrast
3000: 1 (max)

Viewing angles
178/178

Colors displayed
8 bit

Pixel pitch
0.2724 × 0.2724 mm

Response time
1 ms MPRT (Motion Picture Response Time)

Brightness
300 cd / m2 (max)

Coating
anti-glare (3H)

Connectors and ports
HDMI 2.0, HDMI 1.4, DisplayPort 1.2, 3.5 mm audio, Kensington Lock

Wall mount
VESA 100 × 100

Size (with stand)
530.34 × 713.11 × 244.86 mm

Weight (with stand)
7.28 kg

For those that want to know more:

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  • LG 32GK850G Review: 32-inch gaming monitor with QHD and G-Sync resolution
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